Simple Science Activity: Dry Ice Smoke Rings and Bubbles

Continuing on from our previous dry ice experiments – this is what you get when your sons have a geeky aunt…

Read this! Dry ice safety information:

  • direct skin contact with dry ice causes the same damage as a heat burn – always use protective gloves when handling dry ice
  • keep the room well ventilated because carbon dioxide from dry ice displaces oxygen and can lead to a suffocation hazard
  • do not store dry ice in an air tight container because the pressure from the carbon dioxide gas can cause the container to explode
  • do not store dry ice in your freezer because the extremely cold temperature will cause the thermostat to shut off the freezer

Dry Ice Smoke Rings

Here’s what you need:

  • 2 plastic cups with a hole cut out in the bottom (as shown)
  • some dry ice
  • two rubber bands
  • a roll of plastic wrap (like the kind you use to wrap left over food)
  • warm water

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What you do:

  • put a piece of dry ice into the cup
  • cover the open end with some clear wrap
  • hold the clear wrap in place with the rubber band
  • turn the cup upside-down
  • add water into the hole that has been cut-out

Tap the end with the clear wrap and make smoke rings…

We got this from Sick Science! Watch the video:

Dry Ice Bubble

What you will need:

  • dry ice
  • a cup or bowl
  • warm water
  • wet cloth
  • dish washing detergent

What you do:

  • put a piece of dry ice into the cup
  • add some water
  • add detergent to the cloth
  • run the cloth over the lip of the cup so it forms a soap bubble
  • watch the carbon dioxide gas push against the soap bubble to form a “crystal ball”

We got this one from the Crazy Russian Hacker. Watch the video:

Related:

Published by Shen-Li

SHEN-LI LEE is the author of “Brainchild: Secrets to Unlocking Your Child’s Potential”. She is also the founder of Figur8.net (a website on parenting, education, child development) and RightBrainChild.com (a website on Right Brain Education, cognitive development, and maximising potentials). In her spare time, she blogs on Forty, Fit & Fed, and Back to Basics.

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