Right Brain Activities for Home Practice - Part 1 — Babylicious by Figur8

Right Brain Activities for Home Practice – Part 1: Imaging

Having spoken to other mothers from around the world about early child development and right brain education, I realise that we are very fortunate to have not one but three right brain schools in our country.  In many countries there aren’t any right brain schools at all.  So what’s a mother to do if she wants to help develop her child’s right brain on her own?  Here’s a list of right brain activities that I have compiled based on what I have seen, heard, and read about:

These are great activities to do for “home practice” even if your child attends a right brain class.

Update: For more activities that I think are great for developing the brain, check out these articles:

1. Imaging

There are two imaging activities that I know about:

Activity 1:  Ask your child to close his eyes.  Talk him through an imaginary scenario – it can be about anything. For example: you are walking into Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory.  The big gates swing open in front of you.  Can you see Mr Willy Wonka approaching you with his purple coat and walking stick?  He takes you into his factory into the room with lots of candy.  You see a wonderland made entirely of candy – can you smell the chocolate river?  Try some of the sugar flowers – doesn’t it taste sweet on your tongue?  Listen to the music – it’s the Oompa Loompas singing as they work… and so on.

If you’ve seen the Wink program from Right Brain Kids, this is the magic carpet ride activity.

Activity 2:  You need to make image cards for this activity.  Get some pictures of objects and stick them onto a large brightly coloured piece of cardboard.  Stick a dot in the center of the picture to serve as a focal point.

Ask your child to stare at the center of a picture for ten seconds and then close his eyes to.  Ask him if he can “see” the after image of the picture in his mind.  He should work towards being able to see a clear image of the object in his mind.

Here is an example of an image card from the Wink program:

The purpose of imaging:

Imaging is an activity that helps to train the right brain’s imaging ability.  The ability of the right brain to create clear images in the mind is the foundation for many right brain talents, such as being able to speed reading, having a photographic memory, being able to perform rapid complex caculations, being able to perform ESP, etc.

Next: Flash Cards

About the author

Shen-Li Shen-Li is a stay-home mum to two boys who have been the inspiration for her interest in early childhood development and early child education. She searches for the balance in child development methods and the educational philosophies that will enable the nurture of happy, confident and successful children. She shares her views and findings at Figur8.


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Comments

  1. kesdiv says:

    Hi Shenli,
    I am from India..I happen to see your blog though a parenting forum. To be frank I was really surprised to see the amount of info you have given on right brain education. Hats off…I have never heard of such thing these many days…To my knowledge we don’t have right brain schools in India..I am a mother of a daughter aged 30 months…
    From your blog I understand that 30 months is not too late to start few right brain activity…I am planning to start flash cards for my daughter…Infact I was doing it…but in a wrong way…holding the card for so long and asking my daughter so many questions like what is the colour on it..can u identify the letter on it….guess all are left brain work if I am correct…
    I have a doubt regarding flash card…how to flash the cards to the kids…which one is better??hard copy or soft copy(via power point)??personally I prefer hard copy..but looks time consuming…you can mentioned somewhere in ur blog that u have also purchased flash cards from brillkids…jus wanted to know how many flash cards we get from them.. Their product details doesn’t have the count on the number of flash cards we get.

  2. No problem. You don’t have to do everything together like they do in class when you’re doing home practice. Just pick a few things to concentrate on and do them. For example, one day just do linking memory. On another day you can do Mandala. You don’t necessarily have to do all the activities everyday. In fact, that’s probably not a good idea anyway because they get bored of it, even if it was something they previously enjoyed.

    Gavin used to love linking memory so I would do that with him everyday, now he doesn’t like it any more. :-( So there is such a thing as overkill…

  3. Jaycee says:

    Thanks for the tip.
    Home practice has been unsuccessful so far. Now I understand the need of an assistant besides the sensai at heguru. By the time I put aside props for activity A and prepare for activity B, my boy’s attention is already out the window. every thing must be done at super speed, thus resulting in cards not sticking well to the white board, pins giving way to the weight of the charts.. Coupled with my boy’s unwillingness to co-operate, frustrations mounts up like a boiling kettle! At this point, i knew the home practice is doomed for failure. I;m sure my baby felt my immensely negative emotions. sigh.
    I should just stick to flash cards. period.

  4. Jaycee – start with simple patterns. E.g. black and white chess board. The contrast makes it easier. Once you get the hang of that, you can work your way up to harder images – black and white, then red, yellow, blue, then patterns with bright contrasting colours, then pictures. Personally, I find it easier to image “red” pictures compared to some other colours.

  5. Jaycee says:

    Hi Shen-Li,
    Are there specific images that we have to use for imaging activity? I tried imaging with pictures of car, flower and bird but none worked as well as a hot air balloon!

  6. Chin Li – Now that Gareth is older and moving about a lot, I’ve discovered that using posters on the wall is a bad idea. He’s been pulling everything off the walls and tearing them up! It’s upsetting Gavin because he treats these posters as part of his prized possessions. So am thinking that maybe I’ll do little books instead and keep the rest on the computer.

    Jezze – I’m glad you find the information useful. Gavin (3.5 years) is attending Heguru and Gareth (9 months) is attending TW. TW is definitely more suitable for active children. They are more laid back and your child will have more freedom move. Gareth, too, hates being restricted. At home, when I take him away from things he shouldn’t be near (power cables, etc.) he also cries so I know he would never do well in Heguru.

  7. Jezze says:

    Hi Shen-Li,

    Want to say what a great job you are doing in your blog. Keep up the good work :) I’ve learned a lot from your blog on right brain training. Thanks for sharing so much info.

    I’ve started sending my DD to Heguru about 2 months now, but her problem is not sitting thru in class, always walking around and smiling. If I carried her back to sit with me, she will arched her back and start to cry. And I know if the child start to cry, the right brain shuts off. So I just have to let her walk around again.

    Do you encounter this with your kid? I’m wondering what is Tweedlewink classes like? Is it more suitable with ‘active’ kids?

    Thanks,
    Jezze

  8. Erm… I’ve always used the computer. I was thinking about printing them up and sticking them up on the walls like I do for the Thomas Math charts.

  9. Chin Li says:

    Hi Shen and MC: I have started printing out Shen’s flashcards as I need to fill up JW’s day once he gets super bored. Its taking up a lot of paper! wonder if its better to just review it on the computer screen. What would you do Shen?

    MC, I think Keira would enjoy the flash cards though I am sure she knows quite a few of the words already…. :)

  10. MC – great meeting you at the party. If you’re up for it, we can arrange some play dates for the kids. We can have them together with Chin Li and her boys when she’s up for it again.

    The flashcards are a very easy and quick activity to do. The hard part is making them which takes ages. I usually work on them after the kids have gone to sleep. But they go through them so fast, I can hardly keep up! That’s why I prefer to buy them if I can.

    Yean – my pleasure. I was also looking for activities such as these which was what started me on the hunt for books, advice, etc. I intend to go through the different activities in detail and would have done so in this post but it takes quite a while for me to write it out and I don’t have the time to do it all in one sitting. So please hang in there, I will write more!

    Just briefly though – I will go into more detail soon – activities for under 1:

    – flashcards (lots and lots of them!)
    – you can do variations of the games: like ESP and quantity recognition, you just get your baby to touch the card she thinks is the correct answer.
    tangrams, linking memory and mandala, you can practice doing the activity in front of her and let her watch you. Babies are absorbing everything so whatever you do, she’ll be learning, too!

    Daily activity plan – I don’t really have one. I just have a list of things I want to do with them and we try to do as much of it as possible given their current attention span, interest, etc. Some days we do more, some days we do less, some days we do nothing. It just depends on them. The list in the post above are some of the things we do. We also read a lot and play a lot. Don’t worry, I’ll write more about this as well.

  11. yean says:

    Hey Shen Li, thanks for sharing, these activities are exactly what i have been looking up and down for, as i have no idea on what else i can do with my lil girl besides showing her the Tweedle Wink DVDs and flash cards. Do you mind sharing the daily activity plan for both of you boys? Also, i’m wondering what are the types of activity that are suitable for baby under 1 year old as i think imagin is quite advance for my gal for the moment….

    I’m looking forward to more informative post of yours and with your blog, it really helps me as there is no right brain center at my place. :)

  12. mc says:

    hi shen li, May Ching here. wow, you have so much info on your blog. i feel sorta inspired to start the kids on flash cards now… if i can get my lazy butt round to do something about it!

Trackbacks

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